Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Success May 1923

Another magazine that makes its debut in the blog: the American monthly Success, which had quite a success story, seeing that it has been published from 1898 until the present day. No information about the designer of this stylish flapper girl cover.

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Wedding bells

I like Godley and Creme (ex 10CC) a lot, but this is not one of their very best songs. I selected it for today's post because it is 19 years ago that the wedding bells rang for my wife and me. Happy anniversary darling! Art Rock score: 7/10 (good song, I like it when it's played on the radio).

Copyright statement: screenshot from video deemed fair use.

Sunday, March 24, 2019

How Frida Kahlo inspired a New Yorker cover

The New Yorker is justly famous for its beautiful artistic covers. The one published last week is among the best. Created by Malika Favre, its inspiration is drawn from the works of Frida Kahlo, as discussed in the linked art-icle. As a bonus you can not only watch the cover in large scale, but also in an animated version.

Copyright statement: image created via Photofunia; the painting used is thumbnail size and deemed fair use.

Friday, March 22, 2019

Shanghai Shopping Malls

Taken from a series about the hypermodern (and often visually very interesting) shopping malls of Shanghai. This one was taken in the Aegean Palace shopping mall.

Camera: Canon IXUS 170 handheld
Aperture: f/3.6
Focal length: 4.5 mm
Exposure time: 1/30
ISO speed: 200
Post-processing: Picasa 3.0

Copyright statement: image created by myself. Copyright Hennie Schaper.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Ave Maria

The more I see of the work of German expressionist Marianne von Werefkin (1860-1938), the more I wonder why she is not better known than she is. This one dates from 1914. More about von Werefkin in the linked Wikipedia article.

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Keeper dozen: non-vocal symphonies before 1900

This is the third of a series of posts that are inspired by the "Desert Island" phenomenon - and that uses an Ansel Adams quote in the wrong way (Adams stated that 12 photographs per year that you're satisfied with is a good showing). In this post I will select my 12 favourite symphonies before 1900 - symphonies being so important, I felt I had to split this subject into three: two for symphonies without vocals, before and after 1900, and one for symphonies with vocals. There is no ranking, I'll list them by year of composition. I hope these lists inspire you to check out works you do not know yet.

Ludwig van Beethoven - Symphony 6 "Pastoral" [1808]
Franz Schubert - Symphony 8 "Unfinished" [1822]
Hector Berlioz - Symphonie fantastique [1830]
Felix Mendelssohn - Symphony 3 "Scottish" [1842]
Johannes Brahms - Symphony 2 [1877]
Johannes Brahms - Symphony 3 [1883]
Johannes Brahms - Symphony 4 [1884]
Camille Saint-Saëns - Symphony 3 "with organ"[1886]
Gustav Mahler - Symphony 1 [1888]
Antonin Dvořák - Symphony 9 "From the New World" [1893]
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Symphony 6 "Pathétique" [1893]
Anton Bruckner - Symphony 9 [1896]

None of the symphonies before Beethoven came close to making my dozen, not even the ones by Haydn or Mozart. Beethoven himself features only once - and not with his usually preferred symphonies (3,5,7). The final list is surprisingly short of surprises, all very well known works by very well known composers. Even the ones that just missed out (like Beethoven 5, Mendelssohn 4, Brahms 1, Bruckner 8, Sibelius 1, and Dvořák 8) fall into that pattern. Please note that the ninth symphony by Bruckner, my favourite of the twelve, is the three-movement version as left by the composer, excluding the constructed 4th movement that has been recorded in recent years.

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Illumination

This is one of four fascinating Art Deco murals created in the 1930s in the Niagara Hudson Building in Syracuse, New York. I intend to post the others as well the coming weeks. I could find no information about the artist.

Copyright statement: artist and copyright situation unknown. Deemed fair use.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Deform to form a star

I've posted a number of Steven Wilson covers by the duo Rocksferry before in the blog, here is another one. Deform to form a star is a song from Wilson's album Grace before drowning, This acoustic cover is brilliant. Art Rock score: 8/10 (great song, I'd put it on my MP3 player).

Copyright statement: screenshot from video deemed fair use.

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Apple pays artists they hire with gadgets

In Dutch we have a saying about people getting paid with an apple and an egg instead of money. It now turns out that one of the world's richest companies, Apple, has been paying artists that they hire with gadgets like their wire-free earphones rather than money. And no promotion in Apple social media as compensation either. Full story in the link.

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Eden

Yesterday in the gallery I played a few Sarah Brightman CD's. This type of crossover music is not my usual fare, but it does make for good background music. The cover of Eden from 1999 is outstanding as well. Photography (presumably including the cover) is credited to Simon Fowler.

Copyright statement: low resolution images of album covers deemed fair use.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Land of confusion

A recent example of a "CoolArt" type shot. A few years ago I tried the Flickr 365 challenge - shoot and post a picture every day. To overcome bad weather days, I invented what I called "CoolArt": shooting reflections of my wife's colourful paintings in an aluminium cool bag (or a crumpled foil). I tried my hand on this once more earlier this month, and I liked the result. This is my favourite of the series.

Camera: Canon IXUS 170 handheld
Aperture: f/3.6
Focal length: 4.5 mm
Exposure time: 1/125
ISO speed: 200
Post-processing: Picasa 3.0

Copyright statement: image created by myself. Copyright Hennie Schaper.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Keeper dozen: song cycles

This is the second of a series of posts that are inspired by the "Desert Island" phenomenon - and that uses an Ansel Adams quote in the wrong way (Adams stated that 12 photographs per year that you're satisfied with is a good showing). In this post I will select my 12 favourite song cycles of all time. There is no ranking, I'll list them by year of composition. I hope these lists inspire you to check out works you do not know yet.

Franz Schubert - Die schöne Müllerin [1823]
Franz Schubert - Winterreise [1828]
Modest Mussorgsky - Songs and Dances of Death [1877]
Gustav Mahler - Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen [1886]
Maurice Ravel - Shéhérazade [1903]
Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder [1904]
Ralph Vaughan Williams - On Wenlock Edge [1909]
Gustav Mahler - Rückert-Lieder [1910]
Peter Warlock - The curlew [1922]
Richard Strauss - Vier letzte Lieder [1948]
Valentyn Sylvestrov - Quiet songs [1975]
Aulis Sallinen - Songs of Life and Death [1995]

Yes, 25% of the selected song cycles are by Mahler, for me the absolute master of the genre. Kindertotenlieder is my favourite song cycle, period. Note that I've decided to classify the unclassifiable Das Lied von der Erde as a symphony rather than a song cycle. Before Mahler we of course have Schubert with two brilliant cycles, and less predictably Mussorgsky. The likes of Schumann, Berlioz, Brahms and Wolf did not make the cut. The six 20th century cycles that I selected are a mixture of three well-known names (Ravel, Vaughan Williams, Strauss) and three surprises - including two by living composers.

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Aniara

Aniara is a 2018 science fiction movie directed by Kagerman. The poster is effective in suggesting the genre, but it also work an optical illusion, as the eye (at least my eye) gets a feeling of movement.

Copyright statement: lower resolution images of movie posters considered fair use.

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Intersecting shockwaves

A scientific story in Art for Art's Sake? Yes, because it is such a fascinating photograph, and therefore has an art angle. Read the story about this interaction of shockwaves in the link.

Copyright statement: image used with implicit permission from NASA.

Monday, March 11, 2019

Collier's January 1914

Collier's was an American magazine that was founded in 1888, and ceased publication in 1957. This cover is credited to J. Knowles Hare. I took this from an ongoing series about the magazine in the excellent Art & Artists blog (here).

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

California beaches

While the spring weather looks more like autumn here in the Netherlands at the moment, here's a nice vintage poster to get us in the mood for better weather to come. It is ascribed to Maurice Logan, 1923.

Copyright statement: image in public domain.

Saturday, March 09, 2019

Famous logos redesigned in Bauhaus style

Germany’s Bauhaus art school is famous for its bold and minimal approach to design. To mark its centenary, an international community of designers have re-imagined a number of modern brand logos in typical Bauhaus style. The results are excellent, and better appreciated when seen larger in the link.

Copyright statement: all logos thumbnail style, deemed fair use.

Friday, March 08, 2019

Through the looking glass

Last week we visited the artistic town of Ootmarsum in the East of the Netherlands. This abstract is a detail of a glass-based piece of street art. One of my favourite shots of the year.

Camera: Canon IXUS 170 handheld
Aperture: f/4.0
Focal length: 7.3 mm
Exposure time: 1/200
ISO speed: 125
Post-processing: Picasa 3.0

Copyright statement: image created by myself. Copyright Hennie Schaper.